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Bug #13196 ยป java.security.test

Jason King, 2020-11-05 04:29 PM

 
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#
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# This is the "master security properties file".
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#
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# An alternate java.security properties file may be specified
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# from the command line via the system property
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#
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#    -Djava.security.properties=<URL>
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#
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# This properties file appends to the master security properties file.
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# If both properties files specify values for the same key, the value
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# from the command-line properties file is selected, as it is the last
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# one loaded.
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#
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# Also, if you specify
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#
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#    -Djava.security.properties==<URL> (2 equals),
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#
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# then that properties file completely overrides the master security
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# properties file.
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#
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# To disable the ability to specify an additional properties file from
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# the command line, set the key security.overridePropertiesFile
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# to false in the master security properties file. It is set to true
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# by default.
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# In this file, various security properties are set for use by
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# java.security classes. This is where users can statically register
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# Cryptography Package Providers ("providers" for short). The term
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# "provider" refers to a package or set of packages that supply a
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# concrete implementation of a subset of the cryptography aspects of
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# the Java Security API. A provider may, for example, implement one or
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# more digital signature algorithms or message digest algorithms.
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#
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# Each provider must implement a subclass of the Provider class.
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# To register a provider in this master security properties file,
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# specify the provider and priority in the format
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#
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#    security.provider.<n>=<provName | className>
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#
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# This declares a provider, and specifies its preference
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# order n. The preference order is the order in which providers are
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# searched for requested algorithms (when no specific provider is
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# requested). The order is 1-based; 1 is the most preferred, followed
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# by 2, and so on.
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#
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# <provName> must specify the name of the Provider as passed to its super
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# class java.security.Provider constructor. This is for providers loaded
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# through the ServiceLoader mechanism.
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#
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# <className> must specify the subclass of the Provider class whose
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# constructor sets the values of various properties that are required
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# for the Java Security API to look up the algorithms or other
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# facilities implemented by the provider. This is for providers loaded
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# through classpath.
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#
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# Note: Providers can be dynamically registered instead by calls to
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# either the addProvider or insertProviderAt method in the Security
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# class.
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#
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# List of providers and their preference orders (see above):
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#
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security.provider.1=OracleUcrypto
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security.provider.2=SunPKCS11 ${java.home}/conf/security/sunpkcs11-solaris.cfg
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security.provider.3=SUN
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security.provider.4=SunRsaSign
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security.provider.5=SunEC
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security.provider.6=SunJSSE
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security.provider.7=SunJCE
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security.provider.8=SunJGSS
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security.provider.9=SunSASL
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security.provider.10=XMLDSig
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security.provider.11=SunPCSC
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security.provider.12=JdkLDAP
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security.provider.13=JdkSASL
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#
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# A list of preferred providers for specific algorithms. These providers will
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# be searched for matching algorithms before the list of registered providers.
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# Entries containing errors (parsing, etc) will be ignored. Use the
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# -Djava.security.debug=jca property to debug these errors.
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#
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# The property is a comma-separated list of serviceType.algorithm:provider
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# entries. The serviceType (example: "MessageDigest") is optional, and if
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# not specified, the algorithm applies to all service types that support it.
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# The algorithm is the standard algorithm name or transformation.
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# Transformations can be specified in their full standard name
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# (ex: AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding), or as partial matches (ex: AES, AES/CBC).
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# The provider is the name of the provider. Any provider that does not
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# also appear in the registered list will be ignored.
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#
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# There is a special serviceType for this property only to group a set of
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# algorithms together. The type is "Group" and is followed by an algorithm
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# keyword. Groups are to simplify and lessen the entries on the property
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# line. Current groups are:
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#   Group.SHA2 = SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, SHA-512, SHA-512/224, SHA-512/256
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#   Group.HmacSHA2 = HmacSHA224, HmacSHA256, HmacSHA384, HmacSHA512
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#   Group.SHA2RSA = SHA224withRSA, SHA256withRSA, SHA384withRSA, SHA512withRSA
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#   Group.SHA2DSA = SHA224withDSA, SHA256withDSA, SHA384withDSA, SHA512withDSA
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#   Group.SHA2ECDSA = SHA224withECDSA, SHA256withECDSA, SHA384withECDSA, \
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#                     SHA512withECDSA
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#   Group.SHA3 = SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384, SHA3-512
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#   Group.HmacSHA3 = HmacSHA3-224, HmacSHA3-256, HmacSHA3-384, HmacSHA3-512
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#
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# Example:
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#   jdk.security.provider.preferred=AES/GCM/NoPadding:SunJCE, \
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#         MessageDigest.SHA-256:SUN, Group.HmacSHA2:SunJCE
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#
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#jdk.security.provider.preferred=
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#
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# Sun Provider SecureRandom seed source.
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#
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# Select the primary source of seed data for the "NativePRNG", "SHA1PRNG"
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# and "DRBG" SecureRandom implementations in the "Sun" provider.
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# (Other SecureRandom implementations might also use this property.)
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#
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# On Unix-like systems (for example, Solaris/Linux/MacOS), the
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# "NativePRNG", "SHA1PRNG" and "DRBG" implementations obtains seed data from
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# special device files such as file:/dev/random.
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#
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# On Windows systems, specifying the URLs "file:/dev/random" or
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# "file:/dev/urandom" will enable the native Microsoft CryptoAPI seeding
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# mechanism for SHA1PRNG and DRBG.
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#
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# By default, an attempt is made to use the entropy gathering device
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# specified by the "securerandom.source" Security property.  If an
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# exception occurs while accessing the specified URL:
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#
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#     NativePRNG:
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#         a default value of /dev/random will be used.  If neither
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#         are available, the implementation will be disabled.
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#         "file" is the only currently supported protocol type.
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#
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#     SHA1PRNG and DRBG:
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#         the traditional system/thread activity algorithm will be used.
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#
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# The entropy gathering device can also be specified with the System
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# property "java.security.egd". For example:
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#
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#   % java -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/random MainClass
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#
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# Specifying this System property will override the
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# "securerandom.source" Security property.
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#
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# In addition, if "file:/dev/random" or "file:/dev/urandom" is
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# specified, the "NativePRNG" implementation will be more preferred than
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# DRBG and SHA1PRNG in the Sun provider.
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#
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securerandom.source=file:/dev/random
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#
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# A list of known strong SecureRandom implementations.
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#
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# To help guide applications in selecting a suitable strong
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# java.security.SecureRandom implementation, Java distributions should
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# indicate a list of known strong implementations using the property.
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#
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# This is a comma-separated list of algorithm and/or algorithm:provider
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# entries.
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#
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securerandom.strongAlgorithms=NativePRNGBlocking:SUN,DRBG:SUN
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#
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# Sun provider DRBG configuration and default instantiation request.
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#
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# NIST SP 800-90Ar1 lists several DRBG mechanisms. Each can be configured
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# with a DRBG algorithm name, and can be instantiated with a security strength,
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# prediction resistance support, etc. This property defines the configuration
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# and the default instantiation request of "DRBG" SecureRandom implementations
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# in the SUN provider. (Other DRBG implementations can also use this property.)
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# Applications can request different instantiation parameters like security
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# strength, capability, personalization string using one of the
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# getInstance(...,SecureRandomParameters,...) methods with a
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# DrbgParameters.Instantiation argument, but other settings such as the
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# mechanism and DRBG algorithm names are not currently configurable by any API.
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#
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# Please note that the SUN implementation of DRBG always supports reseeding.
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#
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# The value of this property is a comma-separated list of all configurable
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# aspects. The aspects can appear in any order but the same aspect can only
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# appear at most once. Its BNF-style definition is:
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#
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#   Value:
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#     aspect { "," aspect }
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#
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#   aspect:
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#     mech_name | algorithm_name | strength | capability | df
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#
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#   // The DRBG mechanism to use. Default "Hash_DRBG"
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#   mech_name:
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#     "Hash_DRBG" | "HMAC_DRBG" | "CTR_DRBG"
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#
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#   // The DRBG algorithm name. The "SHA-***" names are for Hash_DRBG and
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#   // HMAC_DRBG, default "SHA-256". The "AES-***" names are for CTR_DRBG,
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#   // default "AES-128" when using the limited cryptographic or "AES-256"
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#   // when using the unlimited.
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#   algorithm_name:
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#     "SHA-224" | "SHA-512/224" | "SHA-256" |
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#     "SHA-512/256" | "SHA-384" | "SHA-512" |
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#     "AES-128" | "AES-192" | "AES-256"
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#
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#   // Security strength requested. Default "128"
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#   strength:
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#     "112" | "128" | "192" | "256"
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#
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#   // Prediction resistance and reseeding request. Default "none"
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#   //  "pr_and_reseed" - Both prediction resistance and reseeding
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#   //                    support requested
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#   //  "reseed_only"   - Only reseeding support requested
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#   //  "none"          - Neither prediction resistance not reseeding
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#   //                    support requested
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#   pr:
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#     "pr_and_reseed" | "reseed_only" | "none"
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#
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#   // Whether a derivation function should be used. only applicable
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#   // to CTR_DRBG. Default "use_df"
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#   df:
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#     "use_df" | "no_df"
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#
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# Examples,
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#   securerandom.drbg.config=Hash_DRBG,SHA-224,112,none
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#   securerandom.drbg.config=CTR_DRBG,AES-256,192,pr_and_reseed,use_df
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#
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# The default value is an empty string, which is equivalent to
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#   securerandom.drbg.config=Hash_DRBG,SHA-256,128,none
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#
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securerandom.drbg.config=
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#
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# Class to instantiate as the javax.security.auth.login.Configuration
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# provider.
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#
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login.configuration.provider=sun.security.provider.ConfigFile
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#
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# Default login configuration file
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#
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#login.config.url.1=file:${user.home}/.java.login.config
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#
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# Class to instantiate as the system Policy. This is the name of the class
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# that will be used as the Policy object. The system class loader is used to
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# locate this class.
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#
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policy.provider=sun.security.provider.PolicyFile
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# The default is to have a single system-wide policy file,
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# and a policy file in the user's home directory.
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#
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policy.url.1=file:${java.home}/conf/security/java.policy
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policy.url.2=file:${user.home}/.java.policy
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# whether or not we expand properties in the policy file
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# if this is set to false, properties (${...}) will not be expanded in policy
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# files.
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#
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policy.expandProperties=true
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# whether or not we allow an extra policy to be passed on the command line
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# with -Djava.security.policy=somefile. Comment out this line to disable
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# this feature.
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#
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policy.allowSystemProperty=true
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# whether or not we look into the IdentityScope for trusted Identities
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# when encountering a 1.1 signed JAR file. If the identity is found
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# and is trusted, we grant it AllPermission. Note: the default policy
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# provider (sun.security.provider.PolicyFile) does not support this property.
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#
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policy.ignoreIdentityScope=false
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#
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# Default keystore type.
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#
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keystore.type=pkcs12
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#
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# Controls compatibility mode for JKS and PKCS12 keystore types.
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#
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# When set to 'true', both JKS and PKCS12 keystore types support loading
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# keystore files in either JKS or PKCS12 format. When set to 'false' the
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# JKS keystore type supports loading only JKS keystore files and the PKCS12
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# keystore type supports loading only PKCS12 keystore files.
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#
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keystore.type.compat=true
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#
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# List of comma-separated packages that start with or equal this string
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# will cause a security exception to be thrown when passed to the
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# SecurityManager::checkPackageAccess method unless the corresponding
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# RuntimePermission("accessClassInPackage."+package) has been granted.
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#
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package.access=sun.misc.,\
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               sun.reflect.
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#
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# List of comma-separated packages that start with or equal this string
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# will cause a security exception to be thrown when passed to the
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# SecurityManager::checkPackageDefinition method unless the corresponding
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# RuntimePermission("defineClassInPackage."+package) has been granted.
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#
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# By default, none of the class loaders supplied with the JDK call
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# checkPackageDefinition.
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#
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package.definition=sun.misc.,\
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                   sun.reflect.
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#
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# Determines whether this properties file can be appended to
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# or overridden on the command line via -Djava.security.properties
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#
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security.overridePropertiesFile=true
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#
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# Determines the default key and trust manager factory algorithms for
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# the javax.net.ssl package.
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#
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ssl.KeyManagerFactory.algorithm=SunX509
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ssl.TrustManagerFactory.algorithm=PKIX
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#
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# The Java-level namelookup cache policy for successful lookups:
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#
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# any negative value: caching forever
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# any positive value: the number of seconds to cache an address for
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# zero: do not cache
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#
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# default value is forever (FOREVER). For security reasons, this
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# caching is made forever when a security manager is set. When a security
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# manager is not set, the default behavior in this implementation
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# is to cache for 30 seconds.
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#
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# NOTE: setting this to anything other than the default value can have
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#       serious security implications. Do not set it unless
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#       you are sure you are not exposed to DNS spoofing attack.
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#
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#networkaddress.cache.ttl=-1
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# The Java-level namelookup cache policy for failed lookups:
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#
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# any negative value: cache forever
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# any positive value: the number of seconds to cache negative lookup results
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# zero: do not cache
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#
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# In some Microsoft Windows networking environments that employ
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# the WINS name service in addition to DNS, name service lookups
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# that fail may take a noticeably long time to return (approx. 5 seconds).
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# For this reason the default caching policy is to maintain these
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# results for 10 seconds.
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#
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networkaddress.cache.negative.ttl=10
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#
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# Properties to configure OCSP for certificate revocation checking
357
#
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# Enable OCSP
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#
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# By default, OCSP is not used for certificate revocation checking.
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# This property enables the use of OCSP when set to the value "true".
363
#
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# NOTE: SocketPermission is required to connect to an OCSP responder.
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#
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# Example,
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#   ocsp.enable=true
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#
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# Location of the OCSP responder
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#
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# By default, the location of the OCSP responder is determined implicitly
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# from the certificate being validated. This property explicitly specifies
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# the location of the OCSP responder. The property is used when the
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# Authority Information Access extension (defined in RFC 5280) is absent
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# from the certificate or when it requires overriding.
377
#
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# Example,
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#   ocsp.responderURL=http://ocsp.example.net:80
380

    
381
#
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# Subject name of the OCSP responder's certificate
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#
384
# By default, the certificate of the OCSP responder is that of the issuer
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# of the certificate being validated. This property identifies the certificate
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# of the OCSP responder when the default does not apply. Its value is a string
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# distinguished name (defined in RFC 2253) which identifies a certificate in
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# the set of certificates supplied during cert path validation. In cases where
389
# the subject name alone is not sufficient to uniquely identify the certificate
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# then both the "ocsp.responderCertIssuerName" and
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# "ocsp.responderCertSerialNumber" properties must be used instead. When this
392
# property is set then those two properties are ignored.
393
#
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# Example,
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#   ocsp.responderCertSubjectName=CN=OCSP Responder, O=XYZ Corp
396

    
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#
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# Issuer name of the OCSP responder's certificate
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#
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# By default, the certificate of the OCSP responder is that of the issuer
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# of the certificate being validated. This property identifies the certificate
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# of the OCSP responder when the default does not apply. Its value is a string
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# distinguished name (defined in RFC 2253) which identifies a certificate in
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# the set of certificates supplied during cert path validation. When this
405
# property is set then the "ocsp.responderCertSerialNumber" property must also
406
# be set. When the "ocsp.responderCertSubjectName" property is set then this
407
# property is ignored.
408
#
409
# Example,
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#   ocsp.responderCertIssuerName=CN=Enterprise CA, O=XYZ Corp
411

    
412
#
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# Serial number of the OCSP responder's certificate
414
#
415
# By default, the certificate of the OCSP responder is that of the issuer
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# of the certificate being validated. This property identifies the certificate
417
# of the OCSP responder when the default does not apply. Its value is a string
418
# of hexadecimal digits (colon or space separators may be present) which
419
# identifies a certificate in the set of certificates supplied during cert path
420
# validation. When this property is set then the "ocsp.responderCertIssuerName"
421
# property must also be set. When the "ocsp.responderCertSubjectName" property
422
# is set then this property is ignored.
423
#
424
# Example,
425
#   ocsp.responderCertSerialNumber=2A:FF:00
426

    
427
#
428
# Policy for failed Kerberos KDC lookups:
429
#
430
# When a KDC is unavailable (network error, service failure, etc), it is
431
# put inside a blacklist and accessed less often for future requests. The
432
# value (case-insensitive) for this policy can be:
433
#
434
# tryLast
435
#    KDCs in the blacklist are always tried after those not on the list.
436
#
437
# tryLess[:max_retries,timeout]
438
#    KDCs in the blacklist are still tried by their order in the configuration,
439
#    but with smaller max_retries and timeout values. max_retries and timeout
440
#    are optional numerical parameters (default 1 and 5000, which means once
441
#    and 5 seconds). Please notes that if any of the values defined here is
442
#    more than what is defined in krb5.conf, it will be ignored.
443
#
444
# Whenever a KDC is detected as available, it is removed from the blacklist.
445
# The blacklist is reset when krb5.conf is reloaded. You can add
446
# refreshKrb5Config=true to a JAAS configuration file so that krb5.conf is
447
# reloaded whenever a JAAS authentication is attempted.
448
#
449
# Example,
450
#   krb5.kdc.bad.policy = tryLast
451
#   krb5.kdc.bad.policy = tryLess:2,2000
452
#
453
krb5.kdc.bad.policy = tryLast
454

    
455
#
456
# Kerberos cross-realm referrals (RFC 6806)
457
#
458
# OpenJDK's Kerberos client supports cross-realm referrals as defined in
459
# RFC 6806. This allows to setup more dynamic environments in which clients
460
# do not need to know in advance how to reach the realm of a target principal
461
# (either a user or service).
462
#
463
# When a client issues an AS or a TGS request, the "canonicalize" option
464
# is set to announce support of this feature. A KDC server may fulfill the
465
# request or reply referring the client to a different one. If referred,
466
# the client will issue a new request and the cycle repeats.
467
#
468
# In addition to referrals, the "canonicalize" option allows the KDC server
469
# to change the client name in response to an AS request. For security reasons,
470
# RFC 6806 (section 11) FAST scheme is enforced.
471
#
472
# Disable Kerberos cross-realm referrals. Value may be overwritten with a
473
# System property (-Dsun.security.krb5.disableReferrals).
474
sun.security.krb5.disableReferrals=false
475

    
476
# Maximum number of AS or TGS referrals to avoid infinite loops. Value may
477
# be overwritten with a System property (-Dsun.security.krb5.maxReferrals).
478
sun.security.krb5.maxReferrals=5
479

    
480
#
481
# Algorithm restrictions for certification path (CertPath) processing
482
#
483
# In some environments, certain algorithms or key lengths may be undesirable
484
# for certification path building and validation.  For example, "MD2" is
485
# generally no longer considered to be a secure hash algorithm.  This section
486
# describes the mechanism for disabling algorithms based on algorithm name
487
# and/or key length.  This includes algorithms used in certificates, as well
488
# as revocation information such as CRLs and signed OCSP Responses.
489
# The syntax of the disabled algorithm string is described as follows:
490
#   DisabledAlgorithms:
491
#       " DisabledAlgorithm { , DisabledAlgorithm } "
492
#
493
#   DisabledAlgorithm:
494
#       AlgorithmName [Constraint] { '&' Constraint }
495
#
496
#   AlgorithmName:
497
#       (see below)
498
#
499
#   Constraint:
500
#       KeySizeConstraint | CAConstraint | DenyAfterConstraint |
501
#       UsageConstraint
502
#
503
#   KeySizeConstraint:
504
#       keySize Operator KeyLength
505
#
506
#   Operator:
507
#       <= | < | == | != | >= | >
508
#
509
#   KeyLength:
510
#       Integer value of the algorithm's key length in bits
511
#
512
#   CAConstraint:
513
#       jdkCA
514
#
515
#   DenyAfterConstraint:
516
#       denyAfter YYYY-MM-DD
517
#
518
#   UsageConstraint:
519
#       usage [TLSServer] [TLSClient] [SignedJAR]
520
#
521
# The "AlgorithmName" is the standard algorithm name of the disabled
522
# algorithm. See "Java Cryptography Architecture Standard Algorithm Name
523
# Documentation" for information about Standard Algorithm Names.  Matching
524
# is performed using a case-insensitive sub-element matching rule.  (For
525
# example, in "SHA1withECDSA" the sub-elements are "SHA1" for hashing and
526
# "ECDSA" for signatures.)  If the assertion "AlgorithmName" is a
527
# sub-element of the certificate algorithm name, the algorithm will be
528
# rejected during certification path building and validation.  For example,
529
# the assertion algorithm name "DSA" will disable all certificate algorithms
530
# that rely on DSA, such as NONEwithDSA, SHA1withDSA.  However, the assertion
531
# will not disable algorithms related to "ECDSA".
532
#
533
# A "Constraint" defines restrictions on the keys and/or certificates for
534
# a specified AlgorithmName:
535
#
536
#   KeySizeConstraint:
537
#     keySize Operator KeyLength
538
#       The constraint requires a key of a valid size range if the
539
#       "AlgorithmName" is of a key algorithm.  The "KeyLength" indicates
540
#       the key size specified in number of bits.  For example,
541
#       "RSA keySize <= 1024" indicates that any RSA key with key size less
542
#       than or equal to 1024 bits should be disabled, and
543
#       "RSA keySize < 1024, RSA keySize > 2048" indicates that any RSA key
544
#       with key size less than 1024 or greater than 2048 should be disabled.
545
#       This constraint is only used on algorithms that have a key size.
546
#
547
#   CAConstraint:
548
#     jdkCA
549
#       This constraint prohibits the specified algorithm only if the
550
#       algorithm is used in a certificate chain that terminates at a marked
551
#       trust anchor in the lib/security/cacerts keystore.  If the jdkCA
552
#       constraint is not set, then all chains using the specified algorithm
553
#       are restricted.  jdkCA may only be used once in a DisabledAlgorithm
554
#       expression.
555
#       Example:  To apply this constraint to SHA-1 certificates, include
556
#       the following:  "SHA1 jdkCA"
557
#
558
#   DenyAfterConstraint:
559
#     denyAfter YYYY-MM-DD
560
#       This constraint prohibits a certificate with the specified algorithm
561
#       from being used after the date regardless of the certificate's
562
#       validity.  JAR files that are signed and timestamped before the
563
#       constraint date with certificates containing the disabled algorithm
564
#       will not be restricted.  The date is processed in the UTC timezone.
565
#       This constraint can only be used once in a DisabledAlgorithm
566
#       expression.
567
#       Example:  To deny usage of RSA 2048 bit certificates after Feb 3 2020,
568
#       use the following:  "RSA keySize == 2048 & denyAfter 2020-02-03"
569
#
570
#   UsageConstraint:
571
#     usage [TLSServer] [TLSClient] [SignedJAR]
572
#       This constraint prohibits the specified algorithm for
573
#       a specified usage.  This should be used when disabling an algorithm
574
#       for all usages is not practical. 'TLSServer' restricts the algorithm
575
#       in TLS server certificate chains when server authentication is
576
#       performed. 'TLSClient' restricts the algorithm in TLS client
577
#       certificate chains when client authentication is performed.
578
#       'SignedJAR' constrains use of certificates in signed jar files.
579
#       The usage type follows the keyword and more than one usage type can
580
#       be specified with a whitespace delimiter.
581
#       Example:  "SHA1 usage TLSServer TLSClient"
582
#
583
# When an algorithm must satisfy more than one constraint, it must be
584
# delimited by an ampersand '&'.  For example, to restrict certificates in a
585
# chain that terminate at a distribution provided trust anchor and contain
586
# RSA keys that are less than or equal to 1024 bits, add the following
587
# constraint:  "RSA keySize <= 1024 & jdkCA".
588
#
589
# All DisabledAlgorithms expressions are processed in the order defined in the
590
# property.  This requires lower keysize constraints to be specified
591
# before larger keysize constraints of the same algorithm.  For example:
592
# "RSA keySize < 1024 & jdkCA, RSA keySize < 2048".
593
#
594
# Note: The algorithm restrictions do not apply to trust anchors or
595
# self-signed certificates.
596
#
597
# Note: This property is currently used by Oracle's PKIX implementation. It
598
# is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
599
#
600
# Example:
601
#   jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms=MD2, DSA, RSA keySize < 2048
602
#
603
#
604
jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms=MD2, MD5, SHA1 jdkCA & usage TLSServer, \
605
    RSA keySize < 1024, DSA keySize < 1024, EC keySize < 224
606

    
607
#
608
# Algorithm restrictions for signed JAR files
609
#
610
# In some environments, certain algorithms or key lengths may be undesirable
611
# for signed JAR validation.  For example, "MD2" is generally no longer
612
# considered to be a secure hash algorithm.  This section describes the
613
# mechanism for disabling algorithms based on algorithm name and/or key length.
614
# JARs signed with any of the disabled algorithms or key sizes will be treated
615
# as unsigned.
616
#
617
# The syntax of the disabled algorithm string is described as follows:
618
#   DisabledAlgorithms:
619
#       " DisabledAlgorithm { , DisabledAlgorithm } "
620
#
621
#   DisabledAlgorithm:
622
#       AlgorithmName [Constraint] { '&' Constraint }
623
#
624
#   AlgorithmName:
625
#       (see below)
626
#
627
#   Constraint:
628
#       KeySizeConstraint | DenyAfterConstraint
629
#
630
#   KeySizeConstraint:
631
#       keySize Operator KeyLength
632
#
633
#   DenyAfterConstraint:
634
#       denyAfter YYYY-MM-DD
635
#
636
#   Operator:
637
#       <= | < | == | != | >= | >
638
#
639
#   KeyLength:
640
#       Integer value of the algorithm's key length in bits
641
#
642
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference
643
# implementation. It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other
644
# implementations.
645
#
646
# See "jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms" for syntax descriptions.
647
#
648
jdk.jar.disabledAlgorithms=MD2, MD5, RSA keySize < 1024, \
649
      DSA keySize < 1024
650

    
651
#
652
# Algorithm restrictions for Secure Socket Layer/Transport Layer Security
653
# (SSL/TLS/DTLS) processing
654
#
655
# In some environments, certain algorithms or key lengths may be undesirable
656
# when using SSL/TLS/DTLS.  This section describes the mechanism for disabling
657
# algorithms during SSL/TLS/DTLS security parameters negotiation, including
658
# protocol version negotiation, cipher suites selection, peer authentication
659
# and key exchange mechanisms.
660
#
661
# Disabled algorithms will not be negotiated for SSL/TLS connections, even
662
# if they are enabled explicitly in an application.
663
#
664
# For PKI-based peer authentication and key exchange mechanisms, this list
665
# of disabled algorithms will also be checked during certification path
666
# building and validation, including algorithms used in certificates, as
667
# well as revocation information such as CRLs and signed OCSP Responses.
668
# This is in addition to the jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms property above.
669
#
670
# See the specification of "jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms" for the
671
# syntax of the disabled algorithm string.
672
#
673
# Note: The algorithm restrictions do not apply to trust anchors or
674
# self-signed certificates.
675
#
676
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
677
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
678
#
679
# Example:
680
#   jdk.tls.disabledAlgorithms=MD5, SSLv3, DSA, RSA keySize < 2048
681
jdk.tls.disabledAlgorithms=SSLv3, RC4, DES, MD5withRSA, DH keySize < 1024, \
682
    EC keySize < 224, 3DES_EDE_CBC, anon, NULL
683

    
684
#
685
# Legacy algorithms for Secure Socket Layer/Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS)
686
# processing in JSSE implementation.
687
#
688
# In some environments, a certain algorithm may be undesirable but it
689
# cannot be disabled because of its use in legacy applications.  Legacy
690
# algorithms may still be supported, but applications should not use them
691
# as the security strength of legacy algorithms are usually not strong enough
692
# in practice.
693
#
694
# During SSL/TLS security parameters negotiation, legacy algorithms will
695
# not be negotiated unless there are no other candidates.
696
#
697
# The syntax of the legacy algorithms string is described as this Java
698
# BNF-style:
699
#   LegacyAlgorithms:
700
#       " LegacyAlgorithm { , LegacyAlgorithm } "
701
#
702
#   LegacyAlgorithm:
703
#       AlgorithmName (standard JSSE algorithm name)
704
#
705
# See the specification of security property "jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms"
706
# for the syntax and description of the "AlgorithmName" notation.
707
#
708
# Per SSL/TLS specifications, cipher suites have the form:
709
#       SSL_KeyExchangeAlg_WITH_CipherAlg_MacAlg
710
# or
711
#       TLS_KeyExchangeAlg_WITH_CipherAlg_MacAlg
712
#
713
# For example, the cipher suite TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA uses RSA as the
714
# key exchange algorithm, AES_128_CBC (128 bits AES cipher algorithm in CBC
715
# mode) as the cipher (encryption) algorithm, and SHA-1 as the message digest
716
# algorithm for HMAC.
717
#
718
# The LegacyAlgorithm can be one of the following standard algorithm names:
719
#     1. JSSE cipher suite name, e.g., TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
720
#     2. JSSE key exchange algorithm name, e.g., RSA
721
#     3. JSSE cipher (encryption) algorithm name, e.g., AES_128_CBC
722
#     4. JSSE message digest algorithm name, e.g., SHA
723
#
724
# See SSL/TLS specifications and "Java Cryptography Architecture Standard
725
# Algorithm Name Documentation" for information about the algorithm names.
726
#
727
# Note: If a legacy algorithm is also restricted through the
728
# jdk.tls.disabledAlgorithms property or the
729
# java.security.AlgorithmConstraints API (See
730
# javax.net.ssl.SSLParameters.setAlgorithmConstraints()),
731
# then the algorithm is completely disabled and will not be negotiated.
732
#
733
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
734
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
735
# There is no guarantee the property will continue to exist or be of the
736
# same syntax in future releases.
737
#
738
# Example:
739
#   jdk.tls.legacyAlgorithms=DH_anon, DES_CBC, SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5
740
#
741
jdk.tls.legacyAlgorithms= \
742
        K_NULL, C_NULL, M_NULL, \
743
        DH_anon, ECDH_anon, \
744
        RC4_128, RC4_40, DES_CBC, DES40_CBC, \
745
        3DES_EDE_CBC
746

    
747
#
748
# The pre-defined default finite field Diffie-Hellman ephemeral (DHE)
749
# parameters for Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS/DTLS) processing.
750
#
751
# In traditional SSL/TLS/DTLS connections where finite field DHE parameters
752
# negotiation mechanism is not used, the server offers the client group
753
# parameters, base generator g and prime modulus p, for DHE key exchange.
754
# It is recommended to use dynamic group parameters.  This property defines
755
# a mechanism that allows you to specify custom group parameters.
756
#
757
# The syntax of this property string is described as this Java BNF-style:
758
#   DefaultDHEParameters:
759
#       DefinedDHEParameters { , DefinedDHEParameters }
760
#
761
#   DefinedDHEParameters:
762
#       "{" DHEPrimeModulus , DHEBaseGenerator "}"
763
#
764
#   DHEPrimeModulus:
765
#       HexadecimalDigits
766
#
767
#   DHEBaseGenerator:
768
#       HexadecimalDigits
769
#
770
#   HexadecimalDigits:
771
#       HexadecimalDigit { HexadecimalDigit }
772
#
773
#   HexadecimalDigit: one of
774
#       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F a b c d e f
775
#
776
# Whitespace characters are ignored.
777
#
778
# The "DefinedDHEParameters" defines the custom group parameters, prime
779
# modulus p and base generator g, for a particular size of prime modulus p.
780
# The "DHEPrimeModulus" defines the hexadecimal prime modulus p, and the
781
# "DHEBaseGenerator" defines the hexadecimal base generator g of a group
782
# parameter.  It is recommended to use safe primes for the custom group
783
# parameters.
784
#
785
# If this property is not defined or the value is empty, the underlying JSSE
786
# provider's default group parameter is used for each connection.
787
#
788
# If the property value does not follow the grammar, or a particular group
789
# parameter is not valid, the connection will fall back and use the
790
# underlying JSSE provider's default group parameter.
791
#
792
# Note: This property is currently used by OpenJDK's JSSE implementation. It
793
# is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
794
#
795
# Example:
796
#   jdk.tls.server.defaultDHEParameters=
797
#       { \
798
#       FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF C90FDAA2 2168C234 C4C6628B 80DC1CD1 \
799
#       29024E08 8A67CC74 020BBEA6 3B139B22 514A0879 8E3404DD \
800
#       EF9519B3 CD3A431B 302B0A6D F25F1437 4FE1356D 6D51C245 \
801
#       E485B576 625E7EC6 F44C42E9 A637ED6B 0BFF5CB6 F406B7ED \
802
#       EE386BFB 5A899FA5 AE9F2411 7C4B1FE6 49286651 ECE65381 \
803
#       FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF, 2}
804

    
805
#
806
# TLS key limits on symmetric cryptographic algorithms
807
#
808
# This security property sets limits on algorithms key usage in TLS 1.3.
809
# When the amount of data encrypted exceeds the algorithm value listed below,
810
# a KeyUpdate message will trigger a key change.  This is for symmetric ciphers
811
# with TLS 1.3 only.
812
#
813
# The syntax for the property is described below:
814
#   KeyLimits:
815
#       " KeyLimit { , KeyLimit } "
816
#
817
#   WeakKeyLimit:
818
#       AlgorithmName Action Length
819
#
820
#   AlgorithmName:
821
#       A full algorithm transformation.
822
#
823
#   Action:
824
#       KeyUpdate
825
#
826
#   Length:
827
#       The amount of encrypted data in a session before the Action occurs
828
#       This value may be an integer value in bytes, or as a power of two, 2^29.
829
#
830
#   KeyUpdate:
831
#       The TLS 1.3 KeyUpdate handshake process begins when the Length amount
832
#       is fulfilled.
833
#
834
# Note: This property is currently used by OpenJDK's JSSE implementation. It
835
# is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
836
#
837
jdk.tls.keyLimits=AES/GCM/NoPadding KeyUpdate 2^37
838

    
839
#
840
# Cryptographic Jurisdiction Policy defaults
841
#
842
# Import and export control rules on cryptographic software vary from
843
# country to country.  By default, Java provides two different sets of
844
# cryptographic policy files[1]:
845
#
846
#     unlimited:  These policy files contain no restrictions on cryptographic
847
#                 strengths or algorithms
848
#
849
#     limited:    These policy files contain more restricted cryptographic
850
#                 strengths
851
#
852
# The default setting is determined by the value of the "crypto.policy"
853
# Security property below. If your country or usage requires the
854
# traditional restrictive policy, the "limited" Java cryptographic
855
# policy is still available and may be appropriate for your environment.
856
#
857
# If you have restrictions that do not fit either use case mentioned
858
# above, Java provides the capability to customize these policy files.
859
# The "crypto.policy" security property points to a subdirectory
860
# within <java-home>/conf/security/policy/ which can be customized.
861
# Please see the <java-home>/conf/security/policy/README.txt file or consult
862
# the Java Security Guide/JCA documentation for more information.
863
#
864
# YOU ARE ADVISED TO CONSULT YOUR EXPORT/IMPORT CONTROL COUNSEL OR ATTORNEY
865
# TO DETERMINE THE EXACT REQUIREMENTS.
866
#
867
# [1] Please note that the JCE for Java SE, including the JCE framework,
868
# cryptographic policy files, and standard JCE providers provided with
869
# the Java SE, have been reviewed and approved for export as mass market
870
# encryption item by the US Bureau of Industry and Security.
871
#
872
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
873
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
874
#
875
crypto.policy=unlimited
876

    
877
#
878
# The policy for the XML Signature secure validation mode. The mode is
879
# enabled by setting the property "org.jcp.xml.dsig.secureValidation" to
880
# true with the javax.xml.crypto.XMLCryptoContext.setProperty() method,
881
# or by running the code with a SecurityManager.
882
#
883
#   Policy:
884
#       Constraint {"," Constraint }
885
#   Constraint:
886
#       AlgConstraint | MaxTransformsConstraint | MaxReferencesConstraint |
887
#       ReferenceUriSchemeConstraint | KeySizeConstraint | OtherConstraint
888
#   AlgConstraint
889
#       "disallowAlg" Uri
890
#   MaxTransformsConstraint:
891
#       "maxTransforms" Integer
892
#   MaxReferencesConstraint:
893
#       "maxReferences" Integer
894
#   ReferenceUriSchemeConstraint:
895
#       "disallowReferenceUriSchemes" String { String }
896
#   KeySizeConstraint:
897
#       "minKeySize" KeyAlg Integer
898
#   OtherConstraint:
899
#       "noDuplicateIds" | "noRetrievalMethodLoops"
900
#
901
# For AlgConstraint, Uri is the algorithm URI String that is not allowed.
902
# See the XML Signature Recommendation for more information on algorithm
903
# URI Identifiers. For KeySizeConstraint, KeyAlg is the standard algorithm
904
# name of the key type (ex: "RSA"). If the MaxTransformsConstraint,
905
# MaxReferencesConstraint or KeySizeConstraint (for the same key type) is
906
# specified more than once, only the last entry is enforced.
907
#
908
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation. It
909
# is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
910
#
911
jdk.xml.dsig.secureValidationPolicy=\
912
    disallowAlg http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-xslt-19991116,\
913
    disallowAlg http://www.w3.org/2001/04/xmldsig-more#rsa-md5,\
914
    disallowAlg http://www.w3.org/2001/04/xmldsig-more#hmac-md5,\
915
    disallowAlg http://www.w3.org/2001/04/xmldsig-more#md5,\
916
    maxTransforms 5,\
917
    maxReferences 30,\
918
    disallowReferenceUriSchemes file http https,\
919
    minKeySize RSA 1024,\
920
    minKeySize DSA 1024,\
921
    minKeySize EC 224,\
922
    noDuplicateIds,\
923
    noRetrievalMethodLoops
924

    
925
#
926
# Serialization process-wide filter
927
#
928
# A filter, if configured, is used by java.io.ObjectInputStream during
929
# deserialization to check the contents of the stream.
930
# A filter is configured as a sequence of patterns, each pattern is either
931
# matched against the name of a class in the stream or defines a limit.
932
# Patterns are separated by ";" (semicolon).
933
# Whitespace is significant and is considered part of the pattern.
934
#
935
# If the system property jdk.serialFilter is also specified on the command
936
# line, it supersedes the security property value defined here.
937
#
938
# If a pattern includes a "=", it sets a limit.
939
# If a limit appears more than once the last value is used.
940
# Limits are checked before classes regardless of the order in the
941
# sequence of patterns.
942
# If any of the limits are exceeded, the filter status is REJECTED.
943
#
944
#   maxdepth=value - the maximum depth of a graph
945
#   maxrefs=value  - the maximum number of internal references
946
#   maxbytes=value - the maximum number of bytes in the input stream
947
#   maxarray=value - the maximum array length allowed
948
#
949
# Other patterns, from left to right, match the class or package name as
950
# returned from Class.getName.
951
# If the class is an array type, the class or package to be matched is the
952
# element type.
953
# Arrays of any number of dimensions are treated the same as the element type.
954
# For example, a pattern of "!example.Foo", rejects creation of any instance or
955
# array of example.Foo.
956
#
957
# If the pattern starts with "!", the status is REJECTED if the remaining
958
# pattern is matched; otherwise the status is ALLOWED if the pattern matches.
959
# If the pattern contains "/", the non-empty prefix up to the "/" is the
960
# module name;
961
#   if the module name matches the module name of the class then
962
#   the remaining pattern is matched with the class name.
963
#   If there is no "/", the module name is not compared.
964
# If the pattern ends with ".**" it matches any class in the package and all
965
# subpackages.
966
# If the pattern ends with ".*" it matches any class in the package.
967
# If the pattern ends with "*", it matches any class with the pattern as a
968
# prefix.
969
# If the pattern is equal to the class name, it matches.
970
# Otherwise, the status is UNDECIDED.
971
#
972
#jdk.serialFilter=pattern;pattern
973

    
974
#
975
# RMI Registry Serial Filter
976
#
977
# The filter pattern uses the same format as jdk.serialFilter.
978
# This filter can override the builtin filter if additional types need to be
979
# allowed or rejected from the RMI Registry or to decrease limits but not
980
# to increase limits.
981
# If the limits (maxdepth, maxrefs, or maxbytes) are exceeded, the object is rejected.
982
#
983
# Each non-array type is allowed or rejected if it matches one of the patterns,
984
# evaluated from left to right, and is otherwise allowed. Arrays of any
985
# component type, including subarrays and arrays of primitives, are allowed.
986
#
987
# Array construction of any component type, including subarrays and arrays of
988
# primitives, are allowed unless the length is greater than the maxarray limit.
989
# The filter is applied to each array element.
990
#
991
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
992
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
993
#
994
# The built-in filter allows subclasses of allowed classes and
995
# can approximately be represented as the pattern:
996
#
997
#sun.rmi.registry.registryFilter=\
998
#    maxarray=1000000;\
999
#    maxdepth=20;\
1000
#    java.lang.String;\
1001
#    java.lang.Number;\
1002
#    java.lang.reflect.Proxy;\
1003
#    java.rmi.Remote;\
1004
#    sun.rmi.server.UnicastRef;\
1005
#    sun.rmi.server.RMIClientSocketFactory;\
1006
#    sun.rmi.server.RMIServerSocketFactory;\
1007
#    java.rmi.activation.ActivationID;\
1008
#    java.rmi.server.UID
1009
#
1010
# RMI Distributed Garbage Collector (DGC) Serial Filter
1011
#
1012
# The filter pattern uses the same format as jdk.serialFilter.
1013
# This filter can override the builtin filter if additional types need to be
1014
# allowed or rejected from the RMI DGC.
1015
#
1016
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
1017
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
1018
#
1019
# The builtin DGC filter can approximately be represented as the filter pattern:
1020
#
1021
#sun.rmi.transport.dgcFilter=\
1022
#    java.rmi.server.ObjID;\
1023
#    java.rmi.server.UID;\
1024
#    java.rmi.dgc.VMID;\
1025
#    java.rmi.dgc.Lease;\
1026
#    maxdepth=5;maxarray=10000
1027

    
1028
# CORBA ORBIorTypeCheckRegistryFilter
1029
# Type check enhancement for ORB::string_to_object processing
1030
#
1031
# An IOR type check filter, if configured, is used by an ORB during
1032
# an ORB::string_to_object invocation to check the veracity of the type encoded
1033
# in the ior string.
1034
#
1035
# The filter pattern consists of a semi-colon separated list of class names.
1036
# The configured list contains the binary class names of the IDL interface types
1037
# corresponding to the IDL stub class to be instantiated.
1038
# As such, a filter specifies a list of IDL stub classes that will be
1039
# allowed by an ORB when an ORB::string_to_object is invoked.
1040
# It is used to specify a white list configuration of acceptable
1041
# IDL stub types which may be contained in a stringified IOR
1042
# parameter passed as input to an ORB::string_to_object method.
1043
#
1044
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
1045
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
1046
#
1047
#com.sun.CORBA.ORBIorTypeCheckRegistryFilter=binary_class_name;binary_class_name
1048

    
1049
# The iteration count used for password-based encryption (PBE) in JCEKS
1050
# keystores. Values in the range 10000 to 5000000 are considered valid.
1051
# If the value is out of this range, or is not a number, or is unspecified;
1052
# a default of 200000 is used.
1053
#
1054
# If the system property jdk.jceks.iterationCount is also specified, it
1055
# supersedes the security property value defined here.
1056
#
1057
#jdk.jceks.iterationCount = 200000
1058

    
1059
#
1060
# JCEKS Encrypted Key Serial Filter
1061
#
1062
# This filter, if configured, is used by the JCEKS KeyStore during the
1063
# deserialization of the encrypted Key object stored inside a key entry.
1064
# If not configured or the filter result is UNDECIDED (i.e. none of the patterns
1065
# matches), the filter configured by jdk.serialFilter will be consulted.
1066
#
1067
# If the system property jceks.key.serialFilter is also specified, it supersedes
1068
# the security property value defined here.
1069
#
1070
# The filter pattern uses the same format as jdk.serialFilter. The default
1071
# pattern allows java.lang.Enum, java.security.KeyRep, java.security.KeyRep$Type,
1072
# and javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec and rejects all the others.
1073
jceks.key.serialFilter = java.base/java.lang.Enum;java.base/java.security.KeyRep;\
1074
  java.base/java.security.KeyRep$Type;java.base/javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;!*
1075

    
1076
#
1077
# Enhanced exception message information
1078
#
1079
# By default, exception messages should not include potentially sensitive
1080
# information such as file names, host names, or port numbers. This property
1081
# accepts one or more comma separated values, each of which represents a
1082
# category of enhanced exception message information to enable. Values are
1083
# case-insensitive. Leading and trailing whitespaces, surrounding each value,
1084
# are ignored. Unknown values are ignored.
1085
#
1086
# NOTE: Use caution before setting this property. Setting this property
1087
# exposes sensitive information in Exceptions, which could, for example,
1088
# propagate to untrusted code or be emitted in stack traces that are
1089
# inadvertently disclosed and made accessible over a public network.
1090
#
1091
# The categories are:
1092
#
1093
#  hostInfo - IOExceptions thrown by java.net.Socket and the socket types in the
1094
#             java.nio.channels package will contain enhanced exception
1095
#             message information
1096
#
1097
# The property setting in this file can be overridden by a system property of
1098
# the same name, with the same syntax and possible values.
1099
#
1100
#jdk.includeInExceptions=hostInfo
1101

    
1102
#
1103
# Disabled mechanisms for the Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL)
1104
#
1105
# Disabled mechanisms will not be negotiated by both SASL clients and servers.
1106
# These mechanisms will be ignored if they are specified in the "mechanisms"
1107
# argument of "Sasl.createSaslClient" or the "mechanism" argument of
1108
# "Sasl.createSaslServer".
1109
#
1110
# The value of this property is a comma-separated list of SASL mechanisms.
1111
# The mechanisms are case-sensitive. Whitespaces around the commas are ignored.
1112
#
1113
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
1114
# It is not guaranteed to be examined and used by other implementations.
1115
#
1116
# Example:
1117
#   jdk.sasl.disabledMechanisms=PLAIN, CRAM-MD5, DIGEST-MD5
1118
jdk.sasl.disabledMechanisms=
1119

    
1120
#
1121
# Policies for distrusting Certificate Authorities (CAs).
1122
#
1123
# This is a comma separated value of one or more case-sensitive strings, each
1124
# of which represents a policy for determining if a CA should be distrusted.
1125
# The supported values are:
1126
#
1127
#   SYMANTEC_TLS : Distrust TLS Server certificates anchored by a Symantec
1128
#   root CA and issued after April 16, 2019 unless issued by one of the
1129
#   following subordinate CAs which have a later distrust date:
1130
#     1. Apple IST CA 2 - G1, SHA-256 fingerprint:
1131
#        AC2B922ECFD5E01711772FEA8ED372DE9D1E2245FCE3F57A9CDBEC77296A424B
1132
#        Distrust after December 31, 2019.
1133
#     2. Apple IST CA 8 - G1, SHA-256 fingerprint:
1134
#        A4FE7C7F15155F3F0AEF7AAA83CF6E06DEB97CA3F909DF920AC1490882D488ED
1135
#        Distrust after December 31, 2019.
1136
#
1137
# Leading and trailing whitespace surrounding each value are ignored.
1138
# Unknown values are ignored. If the property is commented out or set to the
1139
# empty String, no policies are enforced.
1140
#
1141
# Note: This property is currently used by the JDK Reference implementation.
1142
# It is not guaranteed to be supported by other SE implementations. Also, this
1143
# property does not override other security properties which can restrict
1144
# certificates such as jdk.tls.disabledAlgorithms or
1145
# jdk.certpath.disabledAlgorithms; those restrictions are still enforced even
1146
# if this property is not enabled.
1147
#
1148
jdk.security.caDistrustPolicies=SYMANTEC_TLS
1149

    
1150
#
1151
# FilePermission path canonicalization
1152
#
1153
# This security property dictates how the path argument is processed and stored
1154
# while constructing a FilePermission object. If the value is set to true, the
1155
# path argument is canonicalized and FilePermission methods (such as implies,
1156
# equals, and hashCode) are implemented based on this canonicalized result.
1157
# Otherwise, the path argument is not canonicalized and FilePermission methods are
1158
# implemented based on the original input. See the implementation note of the
1159
# FilePermission class for more details.
1160
#
1161
# If a system property of the same name is also specified, it supersedes the
1162
# security property value defined here.
1163
#
1164
# The default value for this property is false.
1165
#
1166
jdk.io.permissionsUseCanonicalPath=false
1167

    
1168

    
1169
#
1170
# Policies for the proxy_impersonator Kerberos ccache configuration entry
1171
#
1172
# The proxy_impersonator ccache configuration entry indicates that the ccache
1173
# is a synthetic delegated credential for use with S4U2Proxy by an intermediate
1174
# server. The ccache file should also contain the TGT of this server and
1175
# an evidence ticket from the default principal of the ccache to this server.
1176
#
1177
# This security property determines how Java uses this configuration entry.
1178
# There are 3 possible values:
1179
#
1180
#  no-impersonate     - Ignore this configuration entry, and always act as
1181
#                       the owner of the TGT (if it exists).
1182
#
1183
#  try-impersonate    - Try impersonation when this configuration entry exists.
1184
#                       If no matching TGT or evidence ticket is found,
1185
#                       fallback to no-impersonate.
1186
#
1187
#  always-impersonate - Always impersonate when this configuration entry exists.
1188
#                       If no matching TGT or evidence ticket is found,
1189
#                       no initial credential is read from the ccache.
1190
#
1191
# The default value is "always-impersonate".
1192
#
1193
# If a system property of the same name is also specified, it supersedes the
1194
# security property value defined here.
1195
#
1196
#jdk.security.krb5.default.initiate.credential=always-impersonate
1197

    
1198
#
1199
# Trust Anchor Certificates - CA Basic Constraint check
1200
#
1201
# X.509 v3 certificates used as Trust Anchors (to validate signed code or TLS
1202
# connections) must have the cA Basic Constraint field set to 'true'. Also, if
1203
# they include a Key Usage extension, the keyCertSign bit must be set. These
1204
# checks, enabled by default, can be disabled for backward-compatibility
1205
# purposes with the jdk.security.allowNonCaAnchor System and Security
1206
# properties. In the case that both properties are simultaneously set, the
1207
# System value prevails. The default value of the property is "false".
1208
#
1209
#jdk.security.allowNonCaAnchor=true
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